P1153 Chevy Silverado and GMC Code - How To Fix It?

If you have a P1153 Chevy Silverado and GMC code, your HO2S (Heated Oxygen Sensor) is not switching properly on bank 2 sensor 1. Several things can cause this, but the most common cause is a faulty HO2S. In this blog post, we'll discuss what you can do to fix this problem and get your car back on the road.

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What is the P1153 Chevy Silverado Code?

An explanation of the P1153 diagnostic trouble code commonly encountered in Chevy vehicles.
An explanation of the P1153 diagnostic trouble code commonly encountered in Chevy vehicles.

The P1153 Chevy code is a generic powertrain code that indicates a problem with the heated oxygen sensor (HOS) switching bank sensor. This code is similar to P0153 and P0133 but specifically refers to the HOS switching bank sensor.

If the P1153 Chevy Silverado and GMC code is set, the powertrain control module (PCM) has detected a problem with the HOS switching bank sensor. This sensor is used to monitor the oxygen content of the exhaust gas. If the PCM detects that the oxygen content of the exhaust gas is not within the normal range, it will set this code.

There are a few things that can cause this code to be set. One possibility is that there is a problem with the HOS itself. Another option is that there is a problem with one of the wires or connectors going to or from the HOS. Finally, there's also possibly a problem with the PCM itself.

If you get this code, it's important to have it diagnosed and repaired as soon as possible. If left unrepaired, it can further damage your engine and emissions system.

See also: 2023 Chevy Silverado

What Causes the P1153 Chevy Silverado and GMC Code?

A breakdown of typical factors that may trigger the P1153 code in Chevy models.
A breakdown of typical factors that may trigger the P1153 code in Chevy models.

The P1153 Chevy Silverado and GMC code is caused by a problem with the HO2S (heated oxygen sensor) switching bank sensor. This sensor is located in the front of the engine, near the exhaust manifold. The HO2S monitors the oxygen level in the exhaust gas and sends a signal to the engine computer. The computer uses this information to adjust the fuel mixture.

If the HO2S indicates too much oxygen in the exhaust, the computer will lean out the fuel mixture. This can cause the engine to run rough and reduce power and fuel economy. Sometimes, it may also cause the Check Engine Light to come on.

How to Fix the P1153 Chevy Silverado and GMC Code?

Guidance on diagnosing and addressing the issues associated with the P1153 code in Chevy vehicles.
Guidance on diagnosing and addressing the issues associated with the P1153 code in Chevy vehicles.

When your Chevy Silverado's check engine light comes on, and the code displayed is P1153, it means that there is a problem with the insufficient HO2S switching bank sensor. This sensor is located in the front of the vehicle, on the driver's side. It is responsible for detecting the amount of oxygen in the exhaust gases. If there is not enough oxygen being noticed, it will trigger the check engine light.

It would be best to connect a scan tool to the vehicle's diagnostic port to diagnose this code. Once you have done this, you can check for any trouble codes stored in the computer. If the P1153 code is present, it means that there is a problem with the HO2S insufficient switching bank sensor.

To fix this problem, you must replace the HO2S insufficient switching bank sensor. You can find this sensor at most auto parts stores. Once you have replaced it, clear the trouble codes from the computer using your scan tool, and then take your vehicle for a test drive to see if the check engine light comes back on.

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If your Chevy Silverado is having trouble starting up, idling roughly, or stalling soon after starting, it may have a problem with the intake air temperature (IAT) sensor. The IAT sensor measures the temperature of the air coming into the engine and tells the computer how much fuel to inject. A faulty IAT sensor can cause many problems, so fixing the issue as soon as possible is important.

To test the IAT sensor, you'll need a multimeter. First, locate the sensor on the intake manifold and disconnect the wiring harness. Then, set your multimeter to ohms mode and touch one probe to each exposed terminal on the IAT sensor. The resistance should be between 1k and 5k ohms at room temperature. If it's not within that range, then chances are good that your IAT sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced.

In Conclusion

One of the most common mistakes when diagnosing the P1153 Chevy Silverado and GMC code is not checking all of the wiring and connections to the sensor. If there are any loose, damaged, or corroded wires, they will need to be repaired or replaced. Another common mistake is not testing the sensor itself. The sensor can become damaged over time and may need to be replaced.

Finally, another common mistake is assuming that the P1153 Chevy code is the only thing wrong with the vehicle. There may be other issues that are causing the check engine light to come on.

If you have a Chevy and are experiencing the P1153 code, it is likely due to an issue with your HO2S sensor. Several factors, including a dirty or faulty sensor, a problem with the wiring, or a problem with the computer itself, can cause this. In any case, it's important to take your car to a mechanic so that they can diagnose the problem and fix it for you.

FAQs About P1153 Chevy Silverado and GMC Code

Is it advisable to operate a vehicle with an active P1153 code?

It is recommended to refrain from driving if the P1153 or P1154 codes are active.

What do the codes P1133 and P1153 indicate?

The PCM observes the heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) activity for 60 seconds. Within this timeframe, the PCM records the frequency of the HO2S transitioning between rich and lean and vice versa. A DTC P1133 or a DTC P1153 is triggered when the PCM identifies insufficient switching of the HO2S.

What does the P1133 code mean for a Chevy engine?

The P1133 OBD code is specific to manufacturers like GMC, Chevy, Buick, Toyota, and Isuzu, and it pertains to the functionality of the vehicle's heated oxygen sensor (HO2S).

What could potentially trigger a P0153 code?

Several factors can prompt the PCM to activate a P0153 code, including a malfunctioning oxygen sensor, issues in the oxygen sensor circuit like damaged wires or poor connections, or an engine operating in rich or lean conditions.

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